Posts Tagged Evening Star

“ASSAULT ON COLORED FARM HANDS.” in Anacostia [Evening Star, Jan. 17, 1866]

ASSAULT ON COLORED FARM HANDS. – Yesterday, Mr. Contee, of Maryland, engaged fifteen colored hands in this city to work upon his farm. He put them in charge of his former, a white man, who them to Uniontown, east of the Anacostia, and stopped at the tavern of Robert Martin to get drinks. While in the house the negroes were attacked by white men, and one of the negroes, named Wm. Tucker, was shot through the left shoulder, inflicting a painful but not dangerous wound. The wounded man was taken to the eighth precinct station-house by officer Clements, and Dr. McKim was called to attend him. The Doctor probed the wound, but did not succeed in finding the ball. The injured man will be sent to the contraband hospital.

This morning, Officer Duvall, at the first precinct, arrested a man names McNerhany on the charge of being one of the assailants, and Justice Cull held him to bail for court.

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 17 January. 1866, p. 2.

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“SHIPPING IN THE EASTERN BRANCH” [Evening Star, 3 May, 1882, p. 2]

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

“SHIPPING IN THE EASTERN BRANCH” – From the time the city was laid out up to about 1840 all the shipping business of Washington was done in the Eastern Branch. In 1815 and ’16 there was a company in this city called the ‘Importing and Exporting Co.’ of which William Gowan was president, and which carried on a large trade with the West Indies, England and France. This company loaded and unloaded their ships in the Eastern Branch, by means of scows and flat boats before the requisite number of wharves had been built. They imported sugar and molasses principally, for which they sent back wheat and tobacco.”

SOURCE:

Evening Star, “East Washington in the Past: Recollections of an Old Inhabitant.” 3 May, 1882, p. 2

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“Community Garden in Anacostia Proves Popular” [Evening Star, 24 October 1914]

Courtesy DC Public Library, Special Collections.

Courtesy DC Public Library, Special Collections.

Anyone know where this streetscape is? Any neighborhood historians out there? Historic Anacostia Block Association? Anacostia Historical Society?

Answer will be revealed in forthcoming post.

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Curtis Brothers “fine furniture;” Nichols Ave. at V. St. S.E. [Evening Star, 16 Sept., 1942, p. 5]

Curtis BrothersIf you don’t know about Curtis Brothers, you don’t know about old Anacostia. Here’s a prominent ad for the homegrown business in the Evening Star. More to come…

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“The First House in Uniontown” [Evening Star, 7 December, 1891, p. 10]

1342 U Street SEThe First House In Uniontown

To the Editor of The Evening Star:

I have been much interested in the roadside sketches running through the Saturday STARS, and being an old resident of the District am familiar with most of the localities spoken of. Your correspondent has been misinformed as to the first house built in Uniontown. My father (Thomas Perkins) built the first house in 1854, the frame owned by Mr. Geo F. Pyles. The old brick houses adjoining were built by Robt. Martin about 1865. The old brick house occupied by Weigel’s bakery was the fourth house. It was built by a German baker from Baltimore, who peddled bread and cakes all through the county.

The town was originally named Uniontown. Myself, Robt. Martin and Lawyer J. R. McConnell caused the town to be called Anacostia in 1868 by petition to the Postmaster General (Hon. Horatio King) for the change of the name of the post office to Anacostia post office, Uniontown, D.C. and gradually the Uniontown went out of use. This petition was made because many letters came to the office, which should have been sent to Uniontown, Md., or Uniontown, Ala. Anacostia was suggested to us by the name of the Eastern Branch, which was named after the tribe of Indians who lived in this vicinity. Again, John Fox lived on the heights, one-quarter of a mile east of the Douglass mansion, he is not dead, but living on Fayette Street, Baltimore, engaged in the real estate business. I had a letter from him some time ago (he was guardian to my sisters). My father worked Uniontown as a garden long before Messrs. Fox & Vanhook bought it from Mr. Tucker. I lived there and in the immediate vicinity long before the war and until recently.

Very truly yours,

GEORGE W. PERKINS

December 7, 1891.                    709 A street northeast.

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 7 December, 1891, p. 10

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History and view inside another vacant property, 2245 14th Street SE (Part 1)

2245 14th Street SE in Old AnacostiaAround every corner in Old Anacostia another abandominium seemingly appears. At 2245 14th Street SE, across the street from the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, a vacant property with a fluorescent orange notice from DCRA’s Inspections and Compliance Administration taped to the front door sits largely unnoticed.

Built in March 1902 for 4,000 dollars the two story home has a flat roof and a concrete slab covered by an awning for a front porch. Over the last five years, while reporting on the neighborhood, I’ve exchanged greetings with young and middle-aged men who frequently barbecue and have let members of my tour group pet their dogs. In the last year there has been no presence at the home.

Here’s a look inside the home accompanied by a brief history compiled through public tax and property records, newspaper accounts, and word on the street.

The original owner and architect of the home was Charles Lewis. On March 10, 1902 the Evening Star reported, “Building operations are on the increase in Anacostia, the following buildings being under way; A two-story frame dwelling on Pierce Street, for Charles Lewis…” (Although members of the Anacostia Historic Block Association may not know, Pierce Street is the old name for what is today 14th Street SE.)

Lewis appears in the Washington City Directories in the early 1900s. In 1909, he is listed as, “Lewis, Chas, navy yd, 343 Pierce, Anacostia.”

Next, presumably, to live in the house was a lively family; the Satterfields. Under a headline of “GIRL EVADES PARENTS AND BECOMES BRIDE,” the Star put the family’s business in the streets in April 1915.

“When Beatrice Satterfield failed to return to her home Saturday evening the suspicions of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Satterfield, 2245 14th Street southeast, were aroused, for Beatrice had recently been seen in the company of Phillip Catalano. Later a telephone message was received stating that the couple had been married at Holy Rosary Church by Rev. N. N. De Carto, the pastor. It was further stated that the bride and bridegroom were on their way to Baltimore.

Mr. and Mrs. Satterfield hurriedly set out for Baltimore, and arrived in that city shortly after the happy pair. It has been learned that they planned to visit a brother of the bridegroom. Joseph Catalano, who resides at 427 North Montford street, Baltimore, and thither went the parents of the bride, accompanied by two policeman from the Baltimore force.

Mr. Catalano refused to allow the police to enter his home unless a warrant for his brother’s arrest was produced, and in the meantime a large crowd was attracted by the presence of the two officers. Finally a temporary truce was effected by a telephone conversation between Mrs. Satterfield and her daughter.

No one was at home at the Anacostia address of Mr. and Mrs. Satterfield this morning, so it was impossible to ascertain the truth of conflicting reports as to what the future attitude of the parents of the young bride toward their daughter and newly acquired son-in-law will be.”

On August 27, 1916 the Star reported that an automobile license, number 40903, was issued to Willam E. Satterfield of 2245 14th Street in Southeast. He drove a Chalmers.

A look inside 2245 14th Street SE

 

True to form and his inexperience behind the wheel, he quickly had an accident. In the he late fall of 1916, the Star reported, “While crossing Nichols Avenue at Good Hope road last night, about 7 o’clock, Michael Stearn, seventy years old, was knocked down by an automobile, owned and operated by W. E. Satterfield, 2245 14th street southeast. He was slightly injured but refused an offer of hospital treatment.”

Less than a year after receiving his license, in mid-August of 1917, the “5 passenger” and in “good running” condition was advertised for sale for $125. The ad only appeared once.

In January it was reported in the Star that, “Harold W. Satterfield, sixteen years old, 2245 14th street Anacostia, was bitten in the yesterday afternoon by a dog owned by a neighbor.”

No more information on the Satterfields in Anacostia could be found. (In the 1940 Census the Satterfields, headed by Harold, then 38, living with his parents and a nephew, lived in D Street SE.)

 

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Rebels with a Cause; “Anacostia Unrest” [Evening Star, August 17, 1966]

Evening Star, August 17, 1966 (DC Public Library, Special Collections)

Evening Star, August 17, 1966 (DC Public Library, Special Collections)

On the night of Monday, August 15, 1966, racial tensions exploded in Anacostia. After the arrest of a black neighborhood teenager for assault on a white Maryland man provoked anger at police, hundreds of people protested in the street outside the 11th precinct headquarters at the junction of Morris Road, Nichols Avenue and Chicago Street. When officers brought in German Shepherds from a private security company, the crowd responded by throwing bottles, stones, and fireworks at the dogs. The police, in riot gear, charged the crowd, ultimately arresting at least 10 people. In the days that followed the city investigated the causes of the incident. Neighborhood groups of young people, including the Rebels with a Cause pictured here, organized to put pressure on the police to improve their relations with the community. Police quickly promised not to use dogs in the future, but the investigation would take more than a month to resolve itself. The incident hinted at the tense situation that the residents of Anacostia faced in dealing with the police nearly two years before the 1968 riots struck the entire city after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The full story of the 1966 Anacostia riot will be developed more here in the coming days.

SOURCES:
“Probe Panel Named in Anacostia Unrest,” Evening Star. 17 Aug. 1966: A1. (Image on A4.)
“Probe is Set on Violence in Anacostia,” Washington Post. 17 Aug. 1966: A1.

 

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