Posts Tagged Navy Yard

Waterfront fire, probably burning of the Washington Navy Yard, 1814, Anacostia River, Washington, D.C. by WIlliam Thornton

 

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Source:

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-USZC4-5761

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1867 Report of the Secretary of the Navy, excerpt on Washington Navy Yard [p.92]

Washington Navy Yard _ 1800WASHINGTON.

“The improvements which have been completed at this yard during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1867, are: extension of copper rolling-mill, new cradle for marine railway, paint shop, smithery, and extension of iron foundry. The amount expended during the year is: for materials $29,307.32, and for labor $20,746.39, making an aggregate of $50,053.71

The works which have been in progress during the year, but which are not yet completed, are; dredging channels, gas works, machinery and tools, yard rail tracks, depot for coal, and repairs of all kinds .

….

“This yard was found to be of immense service during the past six years, and the necessity for its extension became more apparent; there are already a number of extensive shops well supplied with machinery for the manufacture or various important articles for the service, but very limited area for working ground outside the buildings, and for sites for other buildings, is a source of great inconvenience and expense.”

 

SOURCE:
Report of the Secretary of the Navy, With an Appendix Containing Bureau Reports, Etc. December 1867. Washington, Government Printing Office., p. 92

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Anacostia & Hillsdale in 1882 Evening Star feature, “Homes for the People in the City of Washington”

Various suburban projects have, from time to time, been started to meet the demands of persons of moderate means who would not be content within the ordinary city dwelling. “Uniontown,” primarily for the employees pf the Navy Yard, is beautifully located on the banks of the “Anacostia” or Eastern branch of the Potomac, on a plateau of gently rising ground backed by a fine range of hills. Along the base and on the rise of these hills, a short distance apart, a suburban negro village called “Hillsdale” has sprung up, as it were, of ingenious growth, which, with its many primitive and rude looking structures liberally covered with whitewash give the landscape here, from a distance a rather picturesque and cheerful appearance. A tramway extends from the city to these suburban villages. The denizens of neither of these settlements seems to have been actuated by any other motive to locate here than that the holders of the ground offered building and garden lots on exceptionally low and favorable terms.

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 15 March 1882, p. 3, “Homes for the People in the City of Washington.”

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