Posts Tagged Uniontown

“ASSAULT ON COLORED FARM HANDS.” in Anacostia [Evening Star, Jan. 17, 1866]

ASSAULT ON COLORED FARM HANDS. – Yesterday, Mr. Contee, of Maryland, engaged fifteen colored hands in this city to work upon his farm. He put them in charge of his former, a white man, who them to Uniontown, east of the Anacostia, and stopped at the tavern of Robert Martin to get drinks. While in the house the negroes were attacked by white men, and one of the negroes, named Wm. Tucker, was shot through the left shoulder, inflicting a painful but not dangerous wound. The wounded man was taken to the eighth precinct station-house by officer Clements, and Dr. McKim was called to attend him. The Doctor probed the wound, but did not succeed in finding the ball. The injured man will be sent to the contraband hospital.

This morning, Officer Duvall, at the first precinct, arrested a man names McNerhany on the charge of being one of the assailants, and Justice Cull held him to bail for court.

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 17 January. 1866, p. 2.

, , ,

Leave a comment

“The First House in Uniontown” [Evening Star, 7 December, 1891, p. 10]

1342 U Street SEThe First House In Uniontown

To the Editor of The Evening Star:

I have been much interested in the roadside sketches running through the Saturday STARS, and being an old resident of the District am familiar with most of the localities spoken of. Your correspondent has been misinformed as to the first house built in Uniontown. My father (Thomas Perkins) built the first house in 1854, the frame owned by Mr. Geo F. Pyles. The old brick houses adjoining were built by Robt. Martin about 1865. The old brick house occupied by Weigel’s bakery was the fourth house. It was built by a German baker from Baltimore, who peddled bread and cakes all through the county.

The town was originally named Uniontown. Myself, Robt. Martin and Lawyer J. R. McConnell caused the town to be called Anacostia in 1868 by petition to the Postmaster General (Hon. Horatio King) for the change of the name of the post office to Anacostia post office, Uniontown, D.C. and gradually the Uniontown went out of use. This petition was made because many letters came to the office, which should have been sent to Uniontown, Md., or Uniontown, Ala. Anacostia was suggested to us by the name of the Eastern Branch, which was named after the tribe of Indians who lived in this vicinity. Again, John Fox lived on the heights, one-quarter of a mile east of the Douglass mansion, he is not dead, but living on Fayette Street, Baltimore, engaged in the real estate business. I had a letter from him some time ago (he was guardian to my sisters). My father worked Uniontown as a garden long before Messrs. Fox & Vanhook bought it from Mr. Tucker. I lived there and in the immediate vicinity long before the war and until recently.

Very truly yours,

GEORGE W. PERKINS

December 7, 1891.                    709 A street northeast.

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 7 December, 1891, p. 10

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

1874 Uniontown Map [Faehtz and Pratt, p. 20]

DC Public Library, Special Collections

DC Public Library, Special Collections

, , ,

Leave a comment

1887 Hopkins Real Estate Map – Uniontown (Anacostia P.O.) [Plat 41]

1887 Hopkins plat map

, , ,

Leave a comment

“Fire in Uniontown” [Evening Star, 6 November, 1854, p. 3]

DC Public Library

DC Public Library

Local Intelligence.

FIRE IN UNIONTOWN. – Last night a row of three or four small frame dwellings located in Uniontown, were totally destroyed by fire. It is supposed to have been the work of an ordinary. There was no possible means of extinguishing the fire, and but few of the neighbors knew any thing of it until this morning. Uniontown is but commenced. The land formerly belonged to Enoch Tucker, Esq., is situated on the Maryland side of the Eastern branch, and was purchased by Messrs. Fox, Van Hook, and Dobbler, who divided it into building lots and sold to various persons, and some of them have commenced building. The finished buildings belong to Messrs. T. W. Perkins, H. Martin, and a gentlemen whose name we could not ascertain but who lives in the city, and owned the burnt row. There is a also a smithshop standing, belonging to Lloyd Jenkins. The rumor this morning that all of Uniontown, except two houses and a smithshop, was burned last night, startled those who did not know which town was referred to.

 

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 6 November, 1854, p. 3

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Uniontown in Albert Boschke’s map of Washington (1861)

Boschke _ Uniontown _ 1861

* Special thanks to Brian Kraft.*

Source:

American Memory, http://1.usa.gov/1g8I0IB

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Anacostia & Hillsdale in 1882 Evening Star feature, “Homes for the People in the City of Washington”

Various suburban projects have, from time to time, been started to meet the demands of persons of moderate means who would not be content within the ordinary city dwelling. “Uniontown,” primarily for the employees pf the Navy Yard, is beautifully located on the banks of the “Anacostia” or Eastern branch of the Potomac, on a plateau of gently rising ground backed by a fine range of hills. Along the base and on the rise of these hills, a short distance apart, a suburban negro village called “Hillsdale” has sprung up, as it were, of ingenious growth, which, with its many primitive and rude looking structures liberally covered with whitewash give the landscape here, from a distance a rather picturesque and cheerful appearance. A tramway extends from the city to these suburban villages. The denizens of neither of these settlements seems to have been actuated by any other motive to locate here than that the holders of the ground offered building and garden lots on exceptionally low and favorable terms.

SOURCE:

Evening Star, 15 March 1882, p. 3, “Homes for the People in the City of Washington.”

, , , ,

Leave a comment